Windows into Heaven: The Iconic Jewelry Collection

MSMH Blog

Posted on January 26 2018

Windows into Heaven: The Iconic Jewelry Collection

I consider the My Saint My Hero Iconic Jewelry Collection one of our most unique and stunning. The iconic image imprinted on each cuff you wear is literally a prayer written through images that has been inspired by the Holy Spirit.

Vivian, Iconic Jewelry Collection artist, at the drawing board

“Icons are actually called prayers. So we’re actually wearing a prayer. While I’m working, my prayer is always that the eyes will draw you into a deeper devotion…” -Vivian/Iconographer

Did you know icons in the Orthodox Christian tradition are written, not painted? The process of making icons is considered more a form of prayer than art, and it is believed that the iconographer’s hand is guided by God. Each brush stroke is a form of meditation and prayer. You can read more about it here.

“Guide the hands of your unworthy servant”…I am not worthy to write this but the Holy Spirit guides me through these images.” -Vivian 

An icon is a “window into heaven” because it offers us a glimpse of what awaits us in eternity with Christ­—it’s like a meeting between heaven and earth.

stack of Iconic Jewelry Collection cuff bracelets displayed against background of tall glass candle holders
An icon is a “window into heaven” because it offers us a glimpse of what awaits us in eternity with Christ­—it’s like a meeting between heaven and earth.

 

 

 

Archangel Michael cuff bracelet shown from various angles

 

Artist Vivian at work in her studio standing at easel

ABOUT THE ARTIST An artist from Southern California, Vivian Imbruglia practices the ancient art of iconography. She learned the traditional techniques of writing icons from several master iconographers, thus merging her artistic abilities with her exploding Catholic faith. Iconography has become more than her profession, it is her ministry. Vivian’s commissioned artwork, both traditional icons and more contemporary sacred images, can be found in churches, abbeys, and private chapels throughout the United States and abroad. One image was given as a gift directly to the Holy Father Pope Francis. When writing original images, Vivian puts great emphasis on the eyes as that aspect most effectively draws in the viewer, encouraging prayerful reflection and meditation. As with all traditional iconography, Vivian never signs the displayed part of her work. Instead she includes on the back, “Written by the hand of Vivian Imbruglia.” At the same time Vivian has developed her own tradition of writing somewhere within every piece the letters “AMDG” which stands for Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam, explaining her ultimate purpose as working for the greater glory of God.

 

 

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